12 Tips for Making Your Bedroom Cozier

 

At the end of a long day, your bedroom should be a sanctuary of comfort that welcomes you in. But, as a room that guests rarely see and in which homeowners spend most of their time with their eyes closed, its upkeep frequently gets pushed to the bottom of the to-do list. Thankfully, there are some little design tricks that can make a big difference. Turn your bedroom into a restful retreat when you up its coziness factor with a few of these easy ideas.

  1. Layer textures. Sheepskin rugs, a down comforter, plush pillows and knit blankets can add a softness to the room that will make you want to sink right in. Lift these textures upward, with a canopy, tufted headboard, billowy curtains and hanging textiles (like a weaving) so even the walls and ceiling feel snuggly.
  2. Pick the right paint. Dark, saturated colors make a room feel like it’s embracing you, which is ideal for setting a sleepy environment. But if you’re nervous to commit to a dark color on the wall, choose a pale dusty blue, sage green or another light natural color for a soothing tone (just steer clear of energetic hues). Have you ever wanted to sleep on a cloud? Go with all-white paint and decor which makes even a basic bedroom feel soft and spa-like.
  3. Personalize it with reminders of the places and things that make you feel at home. Do you have a fondness for flowers? Bring floral patterns in on your textiles. Do you dream of vacation at the lake? Frame a photo of your favorite spot! Photos or paintings of uncluttered natural landscapes—like a sunset reflecting on water or a hammock under the shade of an oak—can rekindle memories of relaxation and are perfect for creating a sense of calm.
  4. Add mood lighting. Soften the light to mimic dusk for an intimate mood with dimmer switches, lamps, lanterns or even string lights. Just make sure you can reach the switch from bed, so you don’t have to disturb your peace to get up and turn it off when you’re ready to roll over and fall asleep.
  5. Skip metallic finishes. Choose warm natural decor options like wood and fabric instead of cold, manufactured metallics. This goes for everything from your bedroom furniture to window treatments. Faux wood blinds, especially when paired with floating curtains, fit with a cozy aesthetic and let you filter out harsh sunlight and maintain privacy for a truly sheltered slumber.
  6. Bring on the books! Stacks of good reads invite you to snuggle in and get lost in another world. A true retreat is a room with plenty of books that begs you to stay.
  7. Fix up—or fake—a fireplace. If your bed sits hearthside, embrace this romantic accent with styled logs and a decorated mantle. If you don’t have such a luxury, create a faux fireplace to add comfort and warmth through your décor: Arrange oversized candles and lanterns safely within a homemade hearth to bring in that cozy fireside feeling without changing the structure of your home.
  8. Keep the room uncluttered. When you want to settle in, a mess distracts you from finding comfort, so minimize the amount of stuff that makes it to your bedroom. Watch your nightstand, which often becomes a catch-all, by making a point to rehome any wandering wares now, and put things away as soon as they enter the room in the future. If you’re apt to let laundry pile up, keep it behind the closed doors of your closet so it doesn’t crowd your peace.
  9. Create a sense of timelessness. Tuck clocks and electronics away so they’re nearby if you need them, but their wires and harsh silhouettes aren’t reminding you of life outside your sanctuary. The hush that falls in a room devoid of gadgets will allow you to easily disengage from the stresses of reality.
  10. Rethink your bedding. Add a pillow-top pad to your mattress so it feels like your bed is hugging you when you climb in. Or, bring in a contoured body pillow which actually can hug you! Linen sheets feel luxe compared to cotton and are a simple swap to boost your bower. Many people also swear by skipping the top sheet while dressing their beds, which allows them to burrow directly into a fluffy comforter.
  11. Appeal to your sense of smell. Aromatherapy can have a huge impact on your perception of a space, so find some soothing essential oils or a sweet candle to blanket the room with an ambiance you adore. As soon as you open the door, you’ll be eager to plunge into your little oasis.
  12. Nestle into nooks. A window seat, a reading nook or an upholstered seating area are all inviting spaces that can draw you in from the doorway. The more intimate alcoves you can create, the cozier your bedroom will feel!

Flooded with soft lighting, plush textures and other comfy touches, your bedroom environment will envelope you at day’s end. And, perhaps even better than the idea of your bedroom refresh itself, is knowing that none of these tips take longer than a weekend to complete! So, slide into your slippers as you settle on which cozy updates you’ll select for your new favorite room of the house.

Posted on March 22, 2018 at 12:48 pm
Fort Collins | Category: Blog, Housing Trends | Tagged , , , ,

6 Extreme Interior Paint Makeovers

Today we’re looking at how paint has changed your rooms, from the kitchen to the bedroom, from the living room to the laundry room.

Makeover 1: Stephanie Van Dyke, original photo on Houzz

AFTER: Houzz user Stephanie Van Dyke’s newly dark living room walls.

Makeover 2: Before Photo, original photo on Houzz

BEFORE: Van Dyke wanted to switch up these light walls. The new colors are Ralph Lauren’s Smoked Glass and Tibetan Jasmine. “The Smoked Glass is a beautiful, dynamic color that changes throughout the day,” she says.

Makeover 3: Before Photo, original photo on Houzz

BEFORE: Houzz user and blogger c2marsha did not have much love for this pale green color in her bedroom. “The old pale green color just felt really stale and boring; we wanted something bolder but not bright or harsh,” she says.

Related: Add Style and Function With a New Bedroom Bench

Makeover 4: c2marsha, original photo on Houzz

AFTER: “We chose Behr Bitter Chocolate for our master bedroom, which sits on the second floor of our Dutch colonial in Minneapolis,” she says. “We didn’t want our room to feel too feminine or masculine, and we wanted it to feel like it fit us well, which made it very difficult to pick a color!”

The rich brown brought in a modern touch that works with their mix of vintage and traditional pieces.

Makeover 5: Before Photo, original photo on Houzz

BEFORE: Maple trees surrounding the house and the colors on the walls made Houzz user hellovijp’s home in Quebec City very dark inside.

Makeover 6: hellovijp, original photo on Houzz

AFTER: Because one room flows into the next and the spaces were lacking cohesion, hellovijp painted the entire floor the same color, SICO’s Portobello #6185-41. It really lightens things up while keeping the look warm.

Makeover 7: Before Photo, original photo on Houzz

BEFORE: Amanda Haytaian wanted a fresh look for her living room; pink walls and a dated fireplace were no longer working.

Makeover 8: Amanda Haytaian, original photo on Houzz

AFTER: She brought the pink into the room via smaller accents. A beautiful new coffered ceiling and marble fireplace surround freshen up the space. The walls are Benjamin Moore’s Etiquette in matte, and the trim is Benjamin Moore’s Steam in semigloss.

Makeover 9: Before Photo, original photo on Houzz

BEFORE: Becky, of the blog this is happiness, had been dreaming of a whiter kitchen.

Makeover 10: Becky, original photo on Houzz

AFTER: “It’s still a work in progress, but we took our very dark kitchen to a cheerful, bright white,” she says. Kwal acrylic paint in Pure Snow did the trick.

Tip: She recommends having the cabinets spray painted to avoid brushstrokes.

Makeover 11: Before Photo, original photo on Houzz

BEFORE: “This laundry room is a great example of white not making a poorly lit, windowless room light and airy; it just made it gray, dingy and scuff-marked,” says Cathy Zaeske.

Makeover 12: Cathy Zaeske, original photo on Houzz

AFTER: Going for an industrial chic look, she chose a new pendant light and Sherwin-Williams’ high-gloss 6076 Turkish Coffee. The new room is much better at inspiring the homeowners to want to do their laundry.

By Becky Harris, Houzz

Posted on February 26, 2018 at 6:13 am
Fort Collins | Category: Blog | Tagged , , , , , , , ,

Your Go-To Guide for Painting Your Home’s Exterior

There’s nothing like a fresh paint job to punch up a house’s curb appeal. And hiring a professional to do it is the best way to get a superior result — and save you the headache of ladders, repairs and other hassles.

Exterior Paint 1Fluidesign Studio, original photo on Houzz

Project: Working with a professional on painting your house’s exterior.

Why: Whether your house is wood-frame or shingle, stucco or brick, you’ll get knowledge, accuracy and efficiency by hiring a professional.

Exterior Paint 2Butler Armsden Architects, original photo on Houzz

Whom to hire: Many painters do both interior and exterior projects. A painting contractor should be licensed and insured. You should obtain a written contract with details about the work to be done. Review the contract to make sure it’s clear which parts of your house’s exterior are to be painted, how long the project will take and how the contractor will be paid.

Cost: A cost estimate should include all labor and materials. Additional detail work, such as painting intricate trim or repairing surface imperfections as part of the preparation work, will usually increase the cost due to the extra time required.

Exterior Paint 3Meyer Greeson Paullin Benson (MGPB), original photo on Houzz

Costs vary by region, size of the project and amount of detail work. Jeff Dupont, of Sound Painting Solutions in Seattle, says a typical range for his medium- to large-size exterior projects (a 1,200- to 1,700- square-foot house is his medium size) is $9,000 to $12,000. Dupont says his contracts have a warranty that includes any touchups needed due to their workmanship or material defects.

How long the project will take: Prepping and painting a house’s exterior usually takes several days, depending on the size of the house. Dupont says if only minimal prep work is needed, a single-story home will take two to three days, and a two-story house two to four days.

Exterior Paint 4PK Atkins Photography, original photo on Houzz

First steps: Many painters visit the site for a free initial consultation to talk about the scope of the project, including giving an estimate of how much it will cost and how long it will take to complete. Benjamin Moore recommends walking each potential contractor around the house, outlining which areas will be painted (siding, trim, window frames, porches, doors).

During the project: After repairing holes and cracks in stucco surfaces and using wood filler to fix frame siding, the contractor will apply a primer. Two coats of latex paint are almost always used, but in some areas, such as the Northwest, an oil-based paint might be applied to tannin-rich cedar or redwood exteriors, to better seal the wood and prevent the tannin from bleeding through the primer, Dupont says. In areas where stucco, masonry and brick homes are prevalent, a durable latex acrylic elastomeric paint might be used — it stretches if cracks form underneath.

Exterior Paint 5Everything Home, original photo on Houzz

Before painting begins, homeowners should remove patio furniture, potted plants and other outdoor accessories in the work area. In general, painters usually remove items like hose holders and mailboxes and replace them when done. Mari Hensley, of Kennedy Painting in St. Louis, says her company asks homeowners to take any fabric cushions on patio furniture inside during the project to prevent damage.

Color considerations: Some painters provide color swatches and consultation, while others expect homeowners to research color combinations on their own. Hensley says samples can be applied to surfaces upon a homeowner’s request. Most large paint companies have online exterior color guides.

Exterior Paint 6Polhemus Savery DaSilva, original photo on Houzz

Sherwin-Williams has color suggestions based on region and style — from traditional or contemporary suburban to desert Southwest. Behr’s Colors Gallery lets users choose from cool, neutral and warm tones.

Things to consider: A reputable professional should have all the necessary supplies, so a homeowner is not expected to provide anything. If your house was built before 1978 and lead paint is suspected, be sure your painter is certified by the Environmental Protection Agency to handle lead. Even exteriors require certain procedures if lead is detected.

Best time to do this project: Summer is the most popular time of year for painting exteriors in regions with cold, wet winters. Even in mild-weather regions, spring and summer are best for tackling exterior paint jobs. Dupont says April to October is prime time for painting exteriors in the Northwest.

By Julie Sheer, Houzz

Posted on October 1, 2017 at 10:00 am
Fort Collins | Category: Housing Trends | Tagged , , , ,